Who Said the Internet of Things Was Only for Smart Homes?





Manufacturing and supply chains are thriving thanks to the Internet of Things.
When a supplier of aviation fuel looked at the enormous logistical difficulty of fuelling planes in foreign airports – transporting oil from the refinery to the plane – from a fresh perspective, they looked at what the newest in IT might do to help. The necessity of the hour was for a very complex system with dependable communication up to the fuelling vehicle. They chose a fuel handling system (FHS) that modeled and integrated the whole process from refinery to fuelling. All gasoline transport vehicles have an onboard computer, touch screen, printer, and PLC (Programmable Logic Control).

Welcome to the fourth industrial revolution.
We are experiencing a new transformation in production and supply around the globe, which we have dubbed The Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0. (Isn’t it true that we can’t get away from software jargon?) The use of communication and information developments to better nearly any activity in the world is at the heart of this revolution. The fundamental motivations are still business-related: a need for more choice, cheaper costs, and higher quality. The industry discovered the solution in fully automated production cells and networked manufacturing, often known as Smart Manufacturing.
According to research by the Aberdeen Group, visibility into telecommunications is cited by 74% of best-in-class firms.

And what Industry 4.0 is doing is bringing together robots, teleoperation, and cloud technology to alter business operations, industrial processes, and consumer services across industries. Service robots, ubiquitous connectivity and communication technology, building automation and management systems, sensor equipped energy management systems, cloud and edge enabled infrastructure, mobile device management, wearable networks, and intelligent software applications are just a few of the supporting technologies. If that seems overwhelming, we’ll break it down for you. It doesn’t matter if you’re talking about a factory, an office, or a business operation.

The catalysts for change

In its research report, Transforming Manufacturing with the Internet of Things, International Data Corporation (IDC) highlighted the following drivers that would affect why and how firms invest in IoT.

Complex, dynamic value chains – As they explore new possibilities throughout the world, manufacturers participate in and manage complex, overlapping value chains that are always changing.

Manufacturing supply chains and product strategies are being reshaped to promote developing market growth sourced from and manufactured in emerging areas and local markets.

Traceability, transparency, brand, and reputation – Increased traceability and transparency will help manufacturers improve their ability to supply product quality and defend their reputations.

Customers’ increased demands for individualized products and greater levels of service are forcing manufacturers to shorten their business cycles.

Converging technologies for manufacturing – For manufacturers to develop, make, and distribute their goods, technologies such as operational technology (OT) and information technology (IT), including the Internet of Things (IoT), are required.

Ubiquitous connection – In devices, interfaces, and processes, the connection is everywhere.

Manufacturers are searching for the truth in data as they seek more useful analysis of larger volumes and types of data, as well as information that will help them move closer to digital execution.

So, what exactly is ‘connected manufacturing’ or smart manufacturing,’ exactly? As we all know, the Internet of Things (IoT) is a network of uniquely identified endpoints (or “things”) that communicate through IP connection without the need for human engagement. Manufacturers are adding software, sensors, and wireless connections to their goods in the industrial environment, laying the groundwork for a new era of operational efficiency through the use of IoT.

Manufacturers are searching for the truth in data as they seek more useful analysis of larger volumes and types of data, as well as information that will help them move closer to digital execution.

So, what exactly is ‘connected manufacturing’ or smart manufacturing,’ exactly? As we all know, the Internet of Things (IoT) is a network of uniquely identified endpoints (or “things”) that communicate through IP connection without the need for human engagement. Manufacturers are adding software, sensors, and wireless connections to their goods in the industrial environment, laying the groundwork for a new era of operational efficiency through the use of IoT.

What does this mean for manufacturing?

Field service based on actual product performance data helps manufacturers and the service channel to increase customer happiness and repair time metrics. Remote diagnosis, monitoring, and even repair of linked items allows manufacturers to maintain product quality standards while also enabling more loyal customer connection

Efficiency – Ability to offer a constant supply of material to OEMs or large industries, as seen in the aviation fuel supply example, depending on production plans and real-time plant inventory status.

Quality – Recording real product performance, developing early warning and detection signals, and providing closed-loop feedback to improve future product quality.
Speed – Managing inventory placements over an increasingly complicated logistics network while having more visibility into real inventory. Order processing time is cut in half. Increased fulfilment capabilities, including the utilization of smaller, more localized facilities.
It isn’t a question of whether or if Industry 4.0 has arrived. (Because it has reshaped and continues to reshape industry and supply). It all boils down to how soon we can equip ourselves to seize this opportunity and turn it into a competitive advantage.



Leave a Comment